TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR ABOUT YOUR HEART HEALTH

Even if your lifestyle’s relatively healthy, it’s a good idea to ask the doctor about your heart health and reducing your risk for another heart event.

HERE’S HOW TO HAVE A PRODUCTIVE DIALOGUE AT YOUR NEXT APPOINTMENT.

We recommend starting with these questions for your doctor. Bookmark or print this page so you have them handy for your next visit.

  • What is my risk for a heart attack or stroke?
  • What are the warning signs or symptoms I should watch out for?
  • What can I do to lower my risk of heart disease and stroke?
  • What is my blood pressure? Is it at a healthy level?
  • What is my blood cholesterol? Is it at a healthy level?
  • What is my blood sugar? Is it at a healthy level?
  • Should I lose or gain weight for my overall health?
  • Am I getting enough exercise?
  • What is a heart healthy eating plan for me?
  • Is aspirin therapy right for me?
  • Are there any supplements I should take for my heart health?
  • What screening or diagnostic tests for heart disease do I need?
  • For smokers: What can I do to help me quit smoking?
  • For women: What are the effects of menopause on my health?
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The American Heart Association® says having sound insight into your risk levels is the key to managing them.

To get a better idea of your heart event risk, use our Heart Attack Risk Assessment Tool In just a few steps you can get a more accurate assessment of your risk level – and get a plan you can reference when you ask the doctor about your risk levels.

HEART ATTACK SURVIVOR STORIES

Aspirin regimen products for recurrent heart attack prevention

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

This tool is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a medical diagnosis, medical advice, or medical treatment. Contact your healthcare provider after using the tool to discuss your heart health or if you have any health concerns.

Estimated risk of a cardiovascular event, specifically, the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) or stroke in the next five years.