STROKE SYMPTOMS IN WOMEN

You may already know about the general warning signs of stroke, but did you know that women sometimes experience different stroke symptoms? Knowing and remembering these stroke signs in women may make a big difference in your own or someone else’s life.

LEARN TO RECOGNIZE STROKE SYMPTOMS IN WOMEN

Stroke Symptoms vs. Stroke Risk Factors for Women

It’s important to know that although some may use “stroke symptoms” and “stroke risk factors” interchangeably, they are different:

Both are good knowledge, but symptoms are what we’re covering here.

WHEN TO GET HELP

If you’re experiencing even one of these symptoms – or are around someone who is – don’t wait.


Take action at the first sign(s):

  1. dial 9-1-1
  2. tell the emergency dispatcher that you “think someone’s having a stroke.”
  3. try to recall when you first noticed the symptoms for the dispatcher.

That third step helps the 9-1-1 operator and first responders make important decisions that can mean the difference between another stroke death statistic and a heart-healthy life as a stroke survivor.

BE THERE FOR THE PEOPLE YOU LOVE

While some women may think of stroke as a problem for men, the sobering fact is that it is the third leading cause of death in American women – 60% of the 137,000 stroke deaths each year in the U.S. are women. Perhaps even more surprising is that in one study of 1,000 women, a large majority could not identify the female-specific stroke signs or symptoms of a stroke. Incredibly, sometimes even stroke survivors trained to spot the symptoms in others didn’t recognize them in their own experiences.

The reason for this wide gap between the facts and women’s awareness may point to a need for women to learn what these specific stroke symptoms in women are. Arming yourself with this knowledge can make a big difference because as any stroke survivor will tell you, there’s a lot to live forward to.
 

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MANAGING RISK:

WHY PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS MAY NOT BE ENOUGH

If you take prescription medications for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes, they may not be enough to protect your heart. Talk to your doctor about whether these medications are enough for you and whether adding an aspirin regimen can help further reduce the risk of another heart attack or clot-related (ischemic) stroke.

LEARN HOW ASPIRIN COULD HELP

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. 

STROKE SURVIVORS HAVE A LOT TO LIVE FORWARD TO

Get inspired by what motivates these stroke survivors.

middle aged woman with younger woman

PENNY S.

“It’s like you’re there, but it’s like you’re in an [out of] body experience.”

SEE PENNY’S STORY >
candid photo of an stroke survivor

ANNA B.

“I didn’t think I was having a stroke. I knew everyone was acting really urgent. It was scary for me!”

SEE ANNA’S STORY >
older man smiling

TOM K.

“I had very good handwriting … and now it’s terrible, but that’s a small price to pay in this life and death situation.”

SEE TOM’S STORY >
woman smiling

JOYCE A.

“I’m celebrating my 52nd birthday in two weeks, and … I’m thankful to be alive.”

SEE JOYCE’S STORY >
woman smiling

TONI G.

“Education is key for me. I feel so good that I’m able to help people.”

SEE TONI’S STORY >

Aspirin regimen products for recurrent stroke prevention

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

Bayer® Aspirin is available in a variety of doses and forms. 
Learn more by clicking on a product below.
Use as directed.

This tool is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a medical diagnosis, medical advice, or medical treatment. Contact your healthcare provider after using the tool to discuss your heart health or if you have any health concerns.

Estimated risk of a cardiovascular event, specifically, the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) or stroke in the next five years.