YOU KNOW ABOUT F.A.S.T. NOW LEARN 5 OTHER STROKE SYMPTOMS

You may already know about common stroke warning signs and the acronym F.A.S.T. But there are other stroke symptoms you should know if you want to be able to help yourself or someone else in an emergency.You may already know about common stroke warning signs and the acronym F.A.S.T. But there are other stroke symptoms you should know if you want to be able to help yourself or someone else in an emergency.

DO YOU KNOW HOW TO RECOGNIZE STROKE SYMPTOMS?

Remembering the acronym F.A.S.T is a powerful way to help save lives if you or someone else is having a stroke. It can help you identify common stroke symptoms, but there are other stroke symptoms to know about. Seconds count when it comes to surviving a stroke, so remembering these 5 additional stroke symptoms may make a big difference in an emergency.

CONFUSION

Because a stroke happens when blood flow to the brain is blocked, it’s easy to remember why one common stroke symptom is unexplained confusion. Stroke survivors describe a sense of being out of their own bodies, being able to speak but not understand their own words, and other ways they felt perplexed during a stroke.

SHARE

NUMBNESS

Numbness, tingling or weakness, especially if it’s on one side of the body, could be a stroke symptom to take seriously. One survivor described the onset of her stroke as a sudden numbness in her left arm while she was having a cup of coffee. She said her “left hand just dropped.”

SHARE

SUDDEN BLINDNESS OR BLURRY VISION

If you’re having unexplained vision issues – sudden blindness, distorted or blurred vision, especially in one eye – remember that it might be the onset of a stroke. It can start out as minor and get worse over several hours, or it may be suddenly pronounced, seemingly for no reason.

SHARE

MOBILITY ISSUES

It could start as a minor case of feeling slightly dizzy, out-of-balance or a general loss of coordination, or as in some stroke survivors’ stories, an unexplainable fall. This stroke symptom might also come on suddenly. Either way, if you’re having unexplained trouble getting around, remember that it could be a stroke and get help immediately.

SHARE

HEADACHE

Headaches can be caused by all kinds of things – loud noise, stress, dehydration, a cold or allergies, weather changes… you name it. The type of headache that could be the onset of a stroke, however, usually can’t be explained. And many times, a headache could be a stroke symptom women experience more often than men. That’s why it’s important to learn and remember a

SHARE

REMEMBER: ONE SYMPTOM IS ENOUGH

Not every stroke survivor experiences all the symptoms. Some report just one symptom while others suffer a couple or more. “Better safe than sorry” may never be truer than when talking about a possible stroke – because every second counts. If you or someone else experiences one of these stroke symptoms – even if you’re not positive – don’t wait to be sure. Dial 9-1-1 on the nearest phone and tell the operator “I think someone’s having a stroke.” It can also be helpful to make a mental note of the approximate time the symptom(s) started, which helps first responders to take the best course of action.

Image

MANAGING RISK:

WHY PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS MAY NOT BE ENOUGH

If you take prescription medications for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes, they may not be enough to protect your heart. Talk to your doctor about whether these medications are enough for you and whether adding an aspirin regimen can help further reduce the risk of another heart attack or clot-related (ischemic) stroke.

LEARN HOW ASPIRIN COULD HELP

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. 

STROKE SURVIVORS HAVE A LOT TO LIVE FORWARD TO

Get inspired by what motivates these stroke survivors.

middle aged woman with younger woman

PENNY S.

“It’s like you’re there, but it’s like you’re in an [out of] body experience.”

SEE PENNY’S STORY >
candid photo of an stroke survivor

ANNA B.

“I didn’t think I was having a stroke. I knew everyone was acting really urgent. It was scary for me!”

SEE ANNA’S STORY >
older man smiling

TOM K.

“I had very good handwriting … and now it’s terrible, but that’s a small price to pay in this life and death situation.”

SEE TOM’S STORY >
woman smiling

JOYCE A.

“I’m celebrating my 52nd birthday in two weeks, and … I’m thankful to be alive.”

SEE JOYCE’S STORY >
woman smiling

TONI G.

“Education is key for me. I feel so good that I’m able to help people.”

SEE TONI’S STORY >

Aspirin regimen products for recurrent stroke prevention

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

Bayer® Aspirin is available in a variety of doses and forms. 
Learn more by clicking on a product below.
Use as directed.

This tool is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a medical diagnosis, medical advice, or medical treatment. Contact your healthcare provider after using the tool to discuss your heart health or if you have any health concerns.

Estimated risk of a cardiovascular event, specifically, the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) or stroke in the next five years.