HOW STROKE AFFECTS THE BODY

Every stroke is different. Some survivors experience minor effects that don’t last long, while others face more serious long-term complications. Even though every stroke is different, there are some common stroke effects that many survivors experience.

EFFECTS OF A STROKE

WHAT CAN YOUR BODY EXPECT AFTER A STROKE?

Key Takeaways

PHYSICAL CHANGES

A stroke can cause physical changes including weakness, stiffness, and numbness. Fortunately, there are treatment options for reducing the physical impact of a stroke on the body.



COGNITIVE CHANGES

After a stroke, it can be challenging to recognize, remember, and process information. Cognitive changes can range from short-term memory loss to dementia.



EMOTIONAL CHANGES

Not every stroke effect is physically apparent. Survivors may also experience hidden effects like anxiety, sadness, anger, and frustration. Some could be caused by the stroke, while others by thoughts and feelings about the event itself.

Experiencing stroke damage in the brain can affect the whole body, and the effects may range from mild to severe. What exactly will your body experience after a stroke? That depends on which part of the brain is damaged.



Each part of the brain is responsible for different functions.

Because the brain is such a complex organ, not every stroke affects every person the same way. That’s because strokes can damage different areas of the brain:

  • The brainstem is located at the base of the brain. It controls the body’s most vital functions like breathing, heartbeat, and blood pressure. Sadly, when a stroke damages the brainstem, serious problems like coma or death may be possible.
  • The cerebrum is the top part of the brain that contains the right and left hemispheres. It controls vital brain functions like movement and vision, among other things.
  • The cerebellum is located under the cerebrum, toward the back of the skull. It receives sensory information from the body and coordinates movement and muscle control.

WHAT IS A CLOT-RELATED (ISCHEMIC) STROKE?

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MANAGING RISK:

WHY PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS MAY NOT BE ENOUGH

If you take prescription medications for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes, they may not be enough to protect your heart. Talk to your doctor about whether these medications are enough for you and whether adding an aspirin regimen can help further reduce the risk of another heart attack or clot-related (ischemic) stroke.

LEARN HOW ASPIRIN COULD HELP

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. 

STROKE SURVIVORS HAVE A LOT TO LIVE FORWARD TO

Get inspired by what motivates these stroke survivors.

middle aged woman with younger woman

PENNY S.

“It’s like you’re there, but it’s like you’re in an [out of] body experience.”

SEE PENNY’S STORY >
candid photo of an stroke survivor

ANNA B.

“I didn’t think I was having a stroke. I knew everyone was acting really urgent. It was scary for me!”

SEE ANNA’S STORY >
older man smiling

TOM K.

“I had very good handwriting … and now it’s terrible, but that’s a small price to pay in this life and death situation.”

SEE TOM’S STORY >
woman smiling

JOYCE A.

“I’m celebrating my 52nd birthday in two weeks, and … I’m thankful to be alive.”

SEE JOYCE’S STORY >
woman smiling

TONI G.

“Education is key for me. I feel so good that I’m able to help people.”

SEE TONI’S STORY >

Aspirin regimen products for recurrent heart attack prevention

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

Bayer® Aspirin is available in a variety of doses and forms. 
Learn more by clicking on a product below.
Use as directed.

This tool is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a medical diagnosis, medical advice, or medical treatment. Contact your healthcare provider after using the tool to discuss your heart health or if you have any health concerns.

Estimated risk of a cardiovascular event, specifically, the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) or stroke in the next five years.