HOW ASPIRIN WORKS AGAINST STROKE

Learn how a Bayer® Aspirin regimen can help limit your risk of having another clot-related (ischemic) stroke, then discuss with your doctor if an aspirin regimen is right for you.

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A Primer on the Makeup of Blood

The blood pumping through your veins and within your vital organs is a small miracle we often take for granted. Knowing more about it is key to understanding how an aspirin regimen for stroke survivors helps to prevent another clot-related (ischemic) stroke. In each drop of blood, you’ll find:

  • Red blood cells: they’re like oxygen delivery trucks. They carry the oxygen we need to live, wherever it’s needed.
  • White blood cells: these tiny soldiers help fight infections
  • Platelets: the sticky cells that come together and create a clot when you get a cut
  • Plasma: the fluid part of blood that makes it all happen, delivering nutrients, hormones and proteins all over the body

Blockages Cause Ischemic Strokes

Platelets form clots, but to understand why that is, you need to know about substances called prostaglandins. These substances are what makes platelets sticky, and when you get a cut, your platelets produce them so they can form a clot to stop the bleeding. 

And while a clot on the outside is good – otherwise you’d continue to bleed – a clot within your blood vessels can be a bad thing. The clotting action within your blood vessels may happen because of another sticky substance: plaque. 

Made up of calcium, cholesterol, and fat – among other things – the stickiness of plaque combined with the stickiness of your platelets can lead to a blockage. And blockages can keep blood from flowing. 

Blood Flow: Aspirin Makes it Possible

If your doctor prescribed an aspirin regimen, it’s because aspirin makes your clotting cells (platelets) less sticky. And if they’re less sticky, they’re less likely to clot, helping prevent another heart attack or clot-related (ischemic) stroke.

WHAT IS A CLOT-RELATED (ISCHEMIC) STROKE?

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MANAGING RISK:

WHY PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS MAY NOT BE ENOUGH

If you take prescription medications for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes, they may not be enough to protect your heart. Talk to your doctor about whether these medications are enough for you and whether adding an aspirin regimen can help further reduce the risk of another heart attack or clot-related (ischemic) stroke.

LEARN HOW ASPIRIN COULD HELP

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. 

STROKE SURVIVORS HAVE A LOT TO LIVE FORWARD TO

Get inspired by what motivates these stroke survivors.

middle aged woman with younger woman

PENNY S.

“It’s like you’re there, but it’s like you’re in an [out of] body experience.”

SEE PENNY’S STORY >
candid photo of an stroke survivor

ANNA B.

“I didn’t think I was having a stroke. I knew everyone was acting really urgent. It was scary for me!”

SEE ANNA’S STORY >
older man smiling

TOM K.

“I had very good handwriting … and now it’s terrible, but that’s a small price to pay in this life and death situation.”

SEE TOM’S STORY >
woman smiling

JOYCE A.

“I’m celebrating my 52nd birthday in two weeks, and … I’m thankful to be alive.”

SEE JOYCE’S STORY >
woman smiling

TONI G.

“Education is key for me. I feel so good that I’m able to help people.”

SEE TONI’S STORY >

Aspirin regimen products for recurrent stroke prevention

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

This tool is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a medical diagnosis, medical advice, or medical treatment. Contact your healthcare provider after using the tool to discuss your heart health or if you have any health concerns.

Estimated risk of a cardiovascular event, specifically, the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) or stroke in the next five years.