LIVE HEART-HEALTHY AFTER A HEART ATTACK

Learn about heart-healthy exercises, nutrition and more. Be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin any exercise routine.

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LEARN MORE ABOUT EXERCISE & NUTRITION FOR A HEART-HEALTHY LIFE

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Partner Up & Make Exercise Part of Your Heart-Healthy Lifestyle

Exercising with a partner can be as fun as it is good for your heart. Get some ideas for exercises you can add to your routine, and share them with the people you care about.

SEE PARTNER EXERCISES
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Heart-Healthy Exercise: Just the Basics

Get tips on creating an exercise routine that will help you build strength and endurance.

LEARN EXERCISE BASICS
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Get Moving to Get Heart Healthy

Find information on how exercise can reduce your risk of heart disease, and get more from your life.

LEARN THE BENEFITS OF EXERCISE
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6 Tips to Help You Stick to Your Exercise Routine

From how to mix up your exercise routine to the importance of accountability, our simple tips can help you stay on plan.

GET TIPS TO KEEP MOVING
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5 Surprisingly Fun Exercises

Check out some fun activities and workout ideas that can help make your workouts something you'll look forward to.

TRY THESE 5 FUN EXERCISES
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Incorporate Cardiac Rehab into Your Recovery Plan

From exercises to emotional support – learn what to expect from a cardiac rehabilitation program.

LEARN ABOUT CARDIAC REHAB
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Heart Healthy Foods You Can Actually Enjoy

Find out what foods to include in your heart healthy diet. There are lots of heart healthy foods that are also delicious!

TRY THESE HEALTHY FOODS
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A Support System May Help You Recover from Your Heart Attack

After a heart attack, you don't have to go it alone. With local and online heart attack support groups, help is available. And don’t forget about your family, friends, and healthcare providers.

BUILD A SUPPORT SYSTEM
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Coping with Depression After a Heart Attack

Read about the relationship between depression and heart disease, and why it's so important to get help.

COPE WITH DEPRESSION
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20% OF

HEART ATTACK

SURVIVORS

OVER 45

WILL HAVE ANOTHER ONE

WITHIN FIVE YEARS.

heart with a gear in the center

70% OF MAJOR

HEART ATTACK

RISK FACTORS

CAN BE MANAGED

THROUGH LIFESTYLE CHOICES.

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27% OF

HEART ATTACKS

HAPPEN TO PEOPLE

WHO'VE ALREADY HAD ONE.

20% of heart attack survivors over the age of 45 will have another one  within five years.
70% of major risk factors for heart attacks can be managed through  lifestyle choices

Surviving a heart attack can mean you’re at a higher risk for another.
The good news: you can still manage other risk factors.

GET PREVENTION TIPS
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MANAGING RISK:

WHY PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS MAY NOT BE ENOUGH

If you take prescription medications for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes, they may not be enough to protect your heart. Talk to your doctor about whether these medications are enough for you and whether adding an aspirin regimen can help further reduce the risk of another heart attack or clot-related (ischemic) stroke.

LEARN HOW ASPIRIN COULD HELP

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regime. 

HEART ATTACK SURVIVOR STORIES

Aspirin regimen products for recurrent heart attack prevention

Aspirin is not appropriate for everyone, so be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.

This tool is intended for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide a medical diagnosis, medical advice, or medical treatment. Contact your healthcare provider after using the tool to discuss your heart health or if you have any health concerns.

Estimated risk of a cardiovascular event, specifically, the risk of a heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) or stroke in the next five years.